Mastering GRE

How to crack GRE : Practical tips for success

by Czech College / Tuesday, 10 March 2015 / Published in Study in Europe

Every year, more than 700,000 people take the Graduate Record Exam, commonly known as the GRE. Graduates Record Examination (GRE) conducted by ETS, is a standardized aptitude test for admissions to post graduate degree courses around the world. It is accepted by all reputed universities for a variety of postgraduate degree programs including management.

Test Structure :

  • Analytical Writing Section with 2 essays (75 minutes)
  • 2 Verbal Sections (30 minutes each)
  • 2 Quantitative Sections (35 minutes each)
  • Experimental Section (either Verbal or Quantitative) (30 minutes)


The GRE is broken down into three primary components: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, and analytical writing. For the verbal reasoning section, test takers have two 30-minute periods to answer two sets of 20 questions. Test-takers answer two sets of 20 quantitative reasoning questions, with 35 minutes to answer each set. The analytical writing section consists of two essays, for which test takers get 30 minutes to write each. The verbal and quantitative reasoning sections are graded on a 130- to 170-point scale in 1-point increments, and the analytical writing section is scored on a 0-6 scale in half-point increments.

1. Relearn what you learnt at High school:

Having trouble differentiating your X-axis from your Y? Have too many late nights in college wiped away the important teachings of Pythagoras? You’re not alone. Many GRE test takers are many years removed from the basic tenets of high school math, which play an important part in the quantitative section of the test. If you’re rusty, it’s important to revisit the concepts of algebra and geometry that you learned in high school.

2. Use,use you dictionary :

While the GRE’s quantitative section is not much more advanced than the math found in the SAT—and familiarity with concepts learned in high school should be enough to post a decent score—the verbal section went to college and graduated with honors in English. Test takers who slept through their English classes or turned to SparkNotes may be in trouble.

During your time in school, be sure to read as much as possible to expand your vocabulary so that you can decipher unfamiliar words, testing experts say. You can assimilate far more diverse vocabulary over four years of college than you could ever hope to by cramming for a few weeks or months prior to the GRE.

3. Take a GRE prep course

No matter how much cramming you might’ve done in college or how stellar your grades were, thinking critically might not come naturally. The tutoring classes tend to pay off.

4. Take a mock test!

While your vocabulary may be impeccable, your writing skills polished, and your quantitative abilities sharpened to a razor’s edge, none of that matters if you’re unaccustomed to the test’s unconventional format.

5. Don’t like your score? Take the mock test again

Schools have access to any GRE scores for tests you’ve taken in the last five years, but experts claim that many universities only care about the best one. While this isn’t true for all schools and all programs, many universities pull the highest scores from the GRE ticket they receive from ETS. The admissions officials (and sometimes work-study students) who receive the tickets are the first line of defense, and oftentimes, they record only the top score when they’re compiling your file before sending it up the admissions food chain.

6. Take a very good English course:

Even if you aren’t an English major and don’t plan on writing the next great American novel, honing your writing skills is integral to overall success on the GRE. The two essays in the analytical section take up roughly one third of the time test takers are allotted. Some testing experts argue that near the end of college you should take a high-level English or writing course.

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